Jumana Manna

Jumana Manna

Break, Take, Erase, Tally

Ends Apr 17
  • On View
  • Exhibition

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Photo credit: Image: Jumana Manna. Old Bread (detail). 2021. Ceramics, plastic bags, galvanized metal. Video: Directed by Nora Rodriguez, Video by Noel Woodford and Marissa Alper, Edited by Marissa Alper
El reggaeton es para perrear

El reggaeton es para perrear

A Playlist by Frieda Toranzo Jaeger

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Frieda Toranzo Jaeger. Sapho. 2022. Oil on canvas. 29 1/2 x 70 1/8 inches (75 x 178 cm)

Frieda Toranzo Jaeger on Reggaeton, Futurity, and Finding Joy

Jumana Manna

Jumana Manna

Cache Sculptures

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Photo credit: Directed by Nora Rodriguez. Video by Marissa Alper and Noel Woodford. Edited by Marissa Alper.

"I was really attracted to [khabyas] and how both incredibly beautiful they were and how they spoke to both bodies and architecture" — Jumana Manna

How does a sculpture come to life? From conception to creation, we caught up with Jumana Manna to watch her Cache series take shape. Tracing the process of research, drawing, and fabrication, Jumana talks about this series of ceramic works inspired by a long obsolete tool for preservation.

Frieda Toranzo Jaeger

Frieda Toranzo Jaeger

Autonomous Drive

Ends Mar 13
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  • Exhibition

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A massive sculpture assembled from painted elements of a car in a gallery.

Frieda Toranzo Jaeger. Hope The Air Conditioning Is On While Facing Global Warming (part 1). 2017. Oil on canvas. 87 7/8 x 176 inches (223 x 447 cm)

Peter Cramer and Jack Waters

Peter Cramer and Jack Waters

Artists Make New York

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"We've always worked as a collective. It's not just our own work that we're trying to generate." — Peter Cramer

Peter Cramer and Jack Waters have been creating community—and creating IN community—for decades. Le Petit Versailles, a community garden on East 2nd street, is one such creation. You might have walked past the tiny garden hundreds of times without knowing that it's part of a long history of artists and community members reclaiming corners of the urban landscape.

Peter and Jack were founding members of the performance group POOL, which staged performances about race, class, sexuality, and urban ecology, throughout the city in the 1980s and 90s. They're also longtime residents of the LES, and gardeners! They've stewarded Le Petit Versailles for the last quarter century, transforming it into a place for performances, community gatherings, and horticulture.

Danielle De Jesus

Danielle De Jesus

Artists Make New York

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Photo credit: Noel Woodford, Nora Rodriguez

"I need to be around my community because it's my muse, it's the reason I do what I do. I had to come back home." — Danielle De Jesus

Meet us on Graham Ave with Danielle De Jesus, an artist featured in "Life Between Buildings." Born and raised in Bushwick, Brooklyn, Danielle has deep ties to the Puerto Rican community that has shaped the neighborhood for generations. Finding inspiration in everything from community gardens to local grocery stores to the colors of the Puerto Rican flag, Danielle's work charts the intersections of green space, gentrification, and Nuyorican community.

Umar Rashid

Umar Rashid

Ancien Regime Change 4, 5, and 6

Ends Mar 13
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  • Exhibition

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Colorful painting with a spaceship, a satelite, and a man riding a zebra fighting a mythical creature, all set against the background of a galaxy.

Umar Rashid, Messier object 66 and the warrior who slew the basilisk and damaged Mission Control. Ad Astra. 2022. Acrylic and ink on canvas. 72 × 84 inches (182.9 × 213.4 centimeters). Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo

Looking For Za'atar

Looking for Za'atar

Mina Stone and Adam HajYahia mark the screening of Jumana Manna's "Foragers"

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Photo credit: Marissa Alper

In conjunction with the presentation of Jumana Manna’s latest film, Foragers (2022), chef Mina Stone will offer a new menu item featuring Za’atar on whipped feta. Find it at Mina’s restaurant at MoMA PS1, or make it at home with the recipe below.

Za’atar—a word used to describe both an herb (thyme) and herb mixture (thyme, sumac, sesame seeds, and salt)—is among the most ubiquitous and beloved flavors of the Levant. Foraging wild Za’atar is an ancient practice, one closely tied to Palestinian identity, food traditions, and the land where it grows. Foragers chronicles the gatherers of wild Za’atar as they track the plants, and are themselves pursued by the Israeli Nature Protection Authority. The film reveals the ways in which longstanding cultural traditions are both constrained by, and struggle against, neoliberal and colonial policies, even those framed as preservationist. Read more about this issue in Manna’s essay for e-flux Journal.

To accompany Mina’s recipe, Palestinian curator and researcher Adam HajYahia contributed an essay on the meaning and history of foraging, which you can read below.

Umar Rashid

Umar Rashid

Sink or Synchronize

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Filmed by Noel Woodford & Marissa Alper; Audio by Nora Rodriguez; Video Editing by Marissa Alper

A jumbotron has just slammed into earth from outer space. And it has a message from the future: "First, you have to sink: a metaphor for reducing one's ego...And then, you must synchronize: become one with everything...It gives you only two options. You can't have fries with that."

Umar Rashid collides history and fantasy to create epic narratives that span continents and millennia. Titled Sink or Synchronize. The voice from the outer realm of the cosmic overlords that compels you, this piece was the artist's first foray into sculpture. Umar worked with a team to execute his vision for this brand new work, created specifically for his show at MoMA PS1.