Jumana Manna

Jumana Manna

Break, Take, Erase, Tally

Ends Apr 17, 2023
  • On View
  • Exhibition

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Jumana Manna. Old Bread (detail). 2021. Ceramics, plastic bags, galvanized metal.

Umar Rashid

Umar Rashid

Sink or Synchronize

  • Video
  • Interview

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Filmed by Noel Woodford & Marissa Alper; Audio by Nora Rodriguez; Video Editing by Marissa Alper

A jumbotron has just slammed into earth from outer space. And it has a message from the future: "First, you have to sink: a metaphor for reducing one's ego...And then, you must synchronize: become one with everything...It gives you only two options. You can't have fries with that."

Umar Rashid collides history and fantasy to create epic narratives that span continents and millennia. Titled Sink or Synchronize. The voice from the outer realm of the cosmic overlords that compels you, this piece was the artist's first foray into sculpture. Umar worked with a team to execute his vision for this brand new work, created specifically for his show at MoMA PS1.

Frieda Toranzo Jaeger

Frieda Toranzo Jaeger

Autonomous Drive

Ends Mar 13, 2023
  • On View
  • Exhibition

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A massive sculpture assembled from painted elements of a car in a gallery.

Frieda Toranzo Jaeger. Hope The Air Conditioning Is On While Facing Global Warming (part 1). 2017. Oil on canvas. 87 7/8 x 176 inches (223 x 447 cm)

Cloudnova Class 2022

Cloudnova Class 2022

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  • Interview

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In the second year of our collaboration with On, we’re highlighting educators, visual artists, and musicians with deep roots at MoMA PS1. The Cloud Novaclass represents the inherent connection between movement, art, and innovative ideas. Frieda Toranzo Jaeger, Damani Pompey, jackie sumell, and L'Rain make up this year's cohort of creators who bring people together through movement.

Get to know these artists in a series of videos exploring how each finds inspiration through engaging the body, the landscape, and their communities.

Umar Rashid

Umar Rashid

Ancien Regime Change 4, 5, and 6

Ends Mar 13, 2023
  • On View
  • Exhibition

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Colorful painting with a spaceship, a satelite, and a man riding a zebra fighting a mythical creature, all set against the background of a galaxy.

Umar Rashid, Messier object 66 and the warrior who slew the basilisk and damaged Mission Control. Ad Astra. 2022. Acrylic and ink on canvas. 72 × 84 inches (182.9 × 213.4 centimeters). Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo

Artists Make New York

Artists Make New York

Nani Chacon

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Photo credit: Video: Noel Woodford, Nora Rodriguez, Marissa Alper

"The first time I came out here my brain couldn't comprehend how linear everything was, because I was so used to this far-stretching, organic landscape. The other thing that I remember immediately feeling when coming to New York was just that the city had a soul." — Nani Chacon

What surprised you when you arrived in New York City? Or, if you've never left, what continues to stop you in your tracks?

Artists have been drawing inspiration from, and drawing on, the city from the start. For Nani Chacon, graffiti and mural making have been strategies to claim a place in the landscape.

Along with fellow artists Tatyana Fazlalizadeh and Layqa Nuna Yawar, Nani helped create the collaborative and participatory mural on the exterior of PS1's Courtyard, After the Fire. The three muralists worked with community members from Make the Road, Transform America and the Shinnecock Matinecocks Nations to conceive of the project.

Freedom to Grow

Freedom to Grow

The Lower Eastside Girls Club & jackie sumell

Ends Apr 3, 2023
  • On View
  • Homeroom
  • Exhibition

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Blue shutter doors with butterfly and dandelion mural reading "What can We Imagine For Ourselves, And World?"

Detail of garden shed at Queensbridge Houses, painted by the Lower Eastside Girls Club interns with artist Nani Chacon in the summer of 2021.

Photo credit: Photo by Eliot Engelmaier
jackie sumell and Mina Stone in Conversation

jackie sumell and Mina Stone in Conversation

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Video by Nora Rodriguez and Noel Woodford

"Plants were used to map significant places along the underground railroad, and okra (ngombo), whose seeds were braided into the hair of the enslaved as they struggled to survive the middle passage, were then planted into colonized soil. The bright yellow ngombo flowers became beacons of hope to other enslaved individuals. It is said that the enslaved could remember their homeland through the flowers that waved to them on foreign soil."
— jackie sumell


jackie sumell's Growing Abolition, a collaboration with interns from the Lower East Side Girls Club, is an opportunity to learn from plants about strategies of resistance, coalition, and healing. jackie sat down with Mina Stone, chef and owner of Mina's at MoMA PS1, to talk about one particularly potent teacher: okra!


Continue the conversation on your plate: starting tomorrow, for a limited time only, Mina's will be serving Bamies—slow cooked okra with tomatoes, onions and chilies—inspired by the work of Growing Abolition. If you can't make it to Mina's, her recipe is available for you to cook at home below!

"Plants were used to map significant places along the underground railroad, and okra (ngombo), whose seeds were braided into the hair of the enslaved as they struggled to survive the middle passage, were then planted into colonized soil. The bright yellow ngombo flowers became beacons of hope to other enslaved individuals. It is said that the enslaved could remember their homeland through the flowers that waved to them on foreign soil."
— jackie sumell


jackie sumell's Growing Abolition, a collaboration with interns from the Lower East Side Girls Club, is an opportunity to learn from plants about strategies of resistance, coalition, and healing. jackie sat down with Mina Stone, chef and owner of Mina's at MoMA PS1, to talk about one particularly potent teacher: okra!


Continue the conversation on your plate: starting tomorrow, for a limited time only, Mina's will be serving Bamies—slow cooked okra with tomatoes, onions and chilies—inspired by the work of Growing Abolition. If you can't make it to Mina's, her recipe is available for you to cook at home below!

Artists Make New York: Layqa Nuna Yawar

Artists Make New York

Layqa Nuna Yawar

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Video: Noel Woodford, Eva Cruz, Nora Rodriguez

New Yorkers know: being NOT from NY is sometimes deeply NY. We met Layqa Nuna Yawar, whose new collaborative mural After the Fire is now on view on MoMA PS1's exterior walls, in New Jersey with a perfect view of the NYC skyline to talk about what it means to work from the outside:

"Being on the periphery, being on the outside...I think it's a blessing, actually. It's another circle to think about my indigeneity not being present, growing up under colonialism...I think that's why I enjoy New Jersey a lot. Because it's a representation of that...Art doesn't happen in the center. It happens in the peripheries."

Artists Make New York, no matter where they start from.